First Cancerian Decanate, Abner Doubleday

CANCER— Decanate. The first decanate of Cancer is depicted in the sky by a little yapping cur—CANIS MINOR—a mongrel without courage or loyalty. By it the ancient masters sought to convey the thought that those born under this section of the sky are particularly susceptible to domestic intrigue. They have strong emotions and may easily be carried away by them. Consequently, they should put forth a persistent effort to cultivate the qualities of faithfulness and poise.

Through the activity of the emotional nature, and their sensitiveness to all that affects life, they are often capable of remarkable poetic and dramatic expression. Unknown to themselves they are the mediums through which entities on the inner planes manifest. And because they are such perfect mediums they sometimes betray the trust placed in them, for they tend to yield to the temporarily strongest influence. They should learn to be positive and firm.

Louis XII of France, who divorced his virtuous and ill-favored queen, Joan, to marry Anne of Brittany, by whom he was dominated, was born with the Sun in this decanate. Nell Gwyn, actress and favorite of Charles II, had her Moon in this place. And Lord Byron, the poet, whose love affairs were none too conventional, was born with this decanate on the Ascendant. It is the decanate of MOODS. (From the First Eighteen Decanates Analyzed)

KPJ– Although we had an abundance of Aries, Taurus, Gemini birthdates among Letter to the Sage correspondence, things slow down at the Solstice, not so much due to lack of birthdates but to how the Cancerians, Leos, Scorpios and Sagittarians cluster in a single decanate and we have only one each for Virgo and Libra. Here is the entry for Doubleday from LTS:

Abner Doubleday

Abner Doubleday was born June 26, 1819 at Ballston Spa, New York. He graduated from West Point in 1842 and served during the Mexican War in the US Artillery. His service in the Civil War began at Fort Sumter, where he was second in command when Confederate forces attacked with the opening shots of the war. Through the war his responsibilities increased with commensurate promotions, culminating in March 1865 as brigadier-general and major-general U.S.A. He retired in 1873 as a colonel and published two books in the next decade, Reminiscences of Forts Sumter and Moultrie (1876) and Chancellorsville and Gettysburg (1882). Doubleday is best known for his contested role in the creation of baseball, which led to the establishment of the National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York, where Doubleday had been educated. He died January 26, 1893 at Mendham, New Jersey.

Doubleday joined the Theosophical Society in 1876 and was closely associated with its founders in New York. After Olcott and Blavatsky departed for India he became TS president pro tem in the United States. He was elected vice president of the TS, a ceremonial office, on April 17, 1880, and worked to keep the society alive during its dormant years in America. His correspondence with Johnson occurred as the TS was beginning to expand with new lodges in Rochester and St. Louis, and includes discussions of the Tarot and of his translation of Éliphas Lévi’s Dogme et rituel de la haute magie, which was not published in full until the 1910s when it was serialized in The Word magazine.

[undated, probably 1882]

Dear Sir

            I certainly owe you an apology for my long delay in answering yours of the [blank space] inst, but before doing so I desired to examine into the condition of the T.S. here as I had been absent from the city nearly all winter.

            Circumstances have been very much against us. Some of the difficulties which have impeded our material progress arise from the peculiarities of some of the members who have simply joined to have their appetite for wonders satisfied, but who seem to take but little interest in the philosophy which remedies the subject. I supposed when I accepted the direction of the society that I would have the cordial cooperation of those of the old members who had been associated with H.P.B. and Olcott. Of these I relied most upon Wm. Q. Judge, as he was the best informed and seems at times to receive interior communications from India. He is a pure high-minded and intelligent student of these mysteries, but like a number of others he has had all he could do to keep the wolf from his door. Several of our most valued members are struggling for a bare subsistence, and this necessarily prevents them giving that attention to our organisation which it ought to receive.

            Our financial plans—upon which we relied to give us ample means—have not succeeded as yet. With money we could establish a central office here which would be of great value in disseminating the important principles of our philosophy. As it is, we must wait for better times, and make haste slowly. I will call another meeting of the Council and see what can be done.

November 12, 1885

Abner Doubleday

Dear Sir

            What arrangement can I make to have 500 copies more or less printed of the impressions of the Magazine articles (translations Dogma and Ritual) after they have appeared in the Magazine.


Mendham, NJ

November 12, 1885

117

Abner Doubleday

Dear Sir

            What arrangement can I make to have 500 copies more or less printed of the impressions of the Magazine articles (translations Dogma and Ritual) after they have appeared in the Magazine.

            I enclose $5.00 for my subscription.

            Yours Very Truly

A. Doubleday

December 3, 1885

Dear Sir

            I am bothered about this question of publishing Levy’s book, I am not desirous of having it sent broadcast over the land but would like to confine it to those who need it and can appreciate it. It seemed to me therefore that your paper would filter it through the public mind gradually and would bring it before the right class of readers. Personally I do not desire any profit from it but I would have liked to have had a little to Wilder and Weiss for their services in aiding me in the translation and by their criticisms. Naturally all of us desire some extra copies, and yet these ought not to be used in such a way as to injure the circulation of your paper or rather to lessen it, by sending out separate portions of its contents. The extra copies if printed, might be distributed by us some time after their publication in your magazine. In this way the circulation of the Platonist could not be lessened. We all recognise its value and as for me would be very loath to do anything that would prevent its having a large circulation.

            At all events I would like an estimate as to what the extra numbers would cost.

            It seems to me too that Wilder ought to be willing to correct the work as you permit print it, if he is willing to do it proof reading; for he does that kind of work rapidly and is the only man I know that is competent for it.

            I enclose $5.00 for my subscription.

            Yours Very Truly

A. Doubleday