Tag Archives: Bronson Alcott

Fruitlands by Richard Francis

Bronson Alcott seems to lurk around every corner in my research into the New England Transcendentalist background of the Thomas Moore Johnson correspondence. His “Western tours” to Missouri and Illinois lit the flame of the movement called the “Missouri Platonists” … Continue reading

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All Roads Lead to Concord

One strange synchronicity is enough to make me say “hmm, wow” to myself; another involving the same subject is enough to make me write about it. Although my past pattern has been to devote years of concentrated effort to a … Continue reading

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Marmee and Louisa (and Bronson, and the Unitarians)

Bronson Alcott has been mentioned in previous posts, and was one of the subjects of my research in Boston this summer. The Concord School of Philosophy was intertwined with the origins of the Hermetic Brotherhood of Luxor in ways I”m … Continue reading

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Eden's Outcasts on Bronson Alcott's astrology

Eden’s Outcasts by John Matteson describes an early, unpublished manuscript that Bronson Alcott produced many years before he published a very different work under the same title, Tablets, in 1868. Influenced by another current interest, astrology, he began to construct … Continue reading

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Bronson Alcott in Mrs. Eddy by Edwin Franden Dakin

An author for whom I have long felt admiration, Edwin Franden Dakin was in his early thirties when he became “controversial” thanks to the furious reaction of the Christian Science church to his brilliant 1929 biography of its founder. Dakin … Continue reading

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Esoteric Origins of the American Renaissance by Arthur Versluis

Bronson Alcott was mentioned as an acquaintance by Sarah Stanley Grimke in early 1879. The following summer marked the opening of the Concord School of Philosophy, which had been planned in connection with Platonists from Missouri and Illinois. The Platonist, … Continue reading

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